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Renown Conservationist Rev. Dr. LoraKim Joyner, Co-Director of One Earth Conservation, explains all about parrot conservation in the latest installment of Eco Luminaries™, the ecoclub.com interview & presentation series.

Dr Joyner points out that "...we could say it's the economic system under which we all live that allows us to cause harm to other habitats, other peoples and other parrots. It...
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Renown Conservationist Rev. Dr. LoraKim Joyner, Co-Director of One Earth Conservation, explains all about parrot conservation in the latest installment of Eco Luminaries™, the ecoclub.com interview & presentation series.Dr Joyner points out that "...we could say it's the economic system under which we all live that allows us to cause harm to other habitats, other peoples and other parrots. It allows us to do this to the parrots. And then we might even say deeper that it's our disconnection and sense of separation of humans from all of life that allows us to be victims, co-victims, in a market economy that extracts and harms..."Parrots are exotic, charismatic, intelligent animals. It's no wonder that people love them, but they actually love them to death. A third of parrot species are threatened with extinction while around half of parrots currently live in cages. Some do not even make it to a cage as they die while being trapped in the tropics in South America and Africa to be sold to North America, Europe, Middle East and Asia. The "lucky" ones that make it to a cage frequently outlive their owners: the larger sized parrots can live up to 100 years only to starve or be euthanized when the owner dies. Others are euthanized a lot earlier, as owners find them too difficult to handle or even violent. Laws are in place in some countries, including EU countries, that ban imports, but apparently these laws are not very effective. As long as possessing captive parrots is not illegal, as long as there is demand, this will continue. The Internet, unfortunately, helps illegal traders find consumers and importers at the other corner of the Earth, while most parrot species can still be legally traded under the CITES convention, so it only takes a falsification of documents to trade parrot species. Yet there are brave visionaries like Dr Joyner who help bring about change a parrot at a time. Can poachers become eco-guides? Can zoos become sanctuaries? Should parrots be recognised as persons? Who and how should fund parrot conservation? Is there enough funding and can tourism help? Let’s find out!https://ecoclub.com/headlines/interviews/all-interviews/1477-220926-lorakim-joyner
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